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Tulane Honors Program

Tuesday, November 28, 2006

Student Initiatives


It is AIDS-Awareness week and as you probably already know, a student-driven Honors round table will take place this Wednesday at 4:30 in the Butler Lounge. Dr. Latha Rajan and Dr. Lisanne Brown, both from Tulane Medical School, will lead a discussion on "AIDS Funding: How Should We Spend the Money?" Ice cream will be served.

Mark your calendars for Wednesday, December 6 at 4:30 in Butler Lounge. Answering student requests, Ms. Laverne Kappel from Education Resource Center will offer a "crash course" on " 'Final' Study Strategies."

We are already thinking about round table events/topics for next semester. If there are topics and/or faculty you would like to see spotlighted, let me know! Send your ideas and we'll get the ball rolling!

Best,
Dr. M.

Friday, November 10, 2006

Events & Course Offerings

Dear Students,

Just a quick reminder that we have a number of activities scheduled for this coming week.

Don’t forget the round table on “Culture and the Computer: Theories of Internet Spectatorship” by Professor Michele White, Communication, on Wednesday, 4:30 in Butler Lounge. Have you ever thought about the expectation that you will slump in front of a computer or that you will rapidly scan a website as opposed to read carefully line by line in a horizontal fashion? Well, you should, because the internet world expects that from you! Professor White will very literally talk “outside the box” and engage us all in a discussion of our crucial role as spectators – both as masters and slaves – of the internet. Delicious refreshments promised!

For our seniors who are plunging into the Honors thesis experience, we are having a “vin d’honneur” for you and your director on Thursday, 17 November, in Cudd Hall from 6 – 7:30. Drinks and appetizers enhanced by a homegrown jazz ensemble will be served up in your honor. You should have received an official invitation, but you do need to RSVP by Monday. Please also take the time to invite personally your director, who also received an invitation. We hope that you will all come out for this event and that it will give you the opportunity to talk with your director in a casual atmosphere as well as meet other students working on their thesis.

As you know, Spring registration has already begun! I am delighted at the number of you who have signed up for Honors courses. It is a true testimony to your engagement with the program and to the caliber of interesting course offerings that well known faculty across campus have proposed.

I would like to highlight the three Mellon-funded colloquia offered this semester (that’s right, no longer two, but three!). As I mentioned at the meeting at Butler, these courses are specially created for Honors students. They are interdisciplinary, intended to address a non-specialized audience, and created to attract a diversity of students that will bring unique perspectives to the classroom experience. All of the courses are enhanced by speaker visits and excursions and they represent the ongoing interests of the faculty member conducting the course. That is, these are courses ripe for discussion because the faculty member is currently exploring the topic (and even in the process of writing on the issue) and because they are seeking to think on a larger scale about issues to match up with the diverse audience. I hope that you will seriously consider taking advantage of this opportunity. It is a chance to explore an area of interest you might have never considered, to meet your peers in a 15-person classroom, and to foster a close relationship with a faculty member. These courses promise dancing, canoeing, and “getting medieval.” Do you really want to miss out on all that???? Here they are:

COLQ 402: FROM THE TACO TO THE TANGO. LATIN AMERICAN ICONS OF MUSIC, DANCE & FOOD. By Professor M. Miller.

THIS COURSE WILL USE AN INTERDISCIPLINARY APPROACH THAT CONSIDERS HISTORY, SOCIOLOGY, FILM STUDIES, PERFORMANCE STUDIES, LITERATURE, ETHNOMUSICOLOGY & CULTURAL STUDIES TO STUDY SEVERAL OF THE ICONS OF IDENTITY & CULTURAL PRODUCTION IN LATIN AMERICA'S PRINCIPLE REGIONS. STUDENTS WILL HEAR, SEE OR TAStE SOME OF THE ELEMENTS THAT TYPIFY LATIN AMERICA FOR U.S. & INTERNATIONAL AUDIANCES, AND WE WILL EXAMINE THESE ICONS IN LIGHT OF THEIR HISTORICAL & POLITICAL CONTEXTS. WE WILL ALSO CONSIDER THE ROLE OF NEW ORLEANS & OTHER U.S. CITIES IN THE TRAFFIC & EXCHANGE OF TASTES, SIGHTS & SOUNDS BETWEEN NORTH AMERICA & ITS SOUTHERN NEIGHBORS. ALL COURSE READINGS & DISCUSSIONS WILL BE IN ENGLISH. Guest lectures will include local musicians and tango dancers!!!

And BACK BY POPULAR DEMAND:
COLQ 412: GRAND CANYON COLLOQUIUM!!!!!!!! By Professor R. Parsley. A study of the anthropology, archaeology, biology, geology, and history of the southern Colorado plateau region, especially the Grand Canyon. Lectures, readings, and research paper followed by a post-semester 8-day float trip though the marble and Grand Canyons. Honors Option available. Please contact Dr. Parsley for further details (parsley@tulane.edu)

COLQ 401: Joan of Arc – Medieval Martyr, Modern Myth. By Prof. D. McGrady. CROSS DRESSER? HERETIC? SORCERESS? WARRIOR? OR MARTYR? WE WILL EXAMINE JOAN'S TRIAL, HER CANONIZATION AS A SAINT AS WELL AS HER PORTRAYAL IN MODERN WORLD FICTION, THEATRE, FILM & THE VISUAL ARTS - FROM VOLTAIRE'S SATIRIC ATTACK ON JOAN TO JAPANESE GRAPHIC NOVELS, FROM SILENT FILM TO MODERN DANCE.